Actually Know How Do Doctors Diagnose Hemorrhoids?

Published: 09th April 2009
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Unless there is rectal bleeding, most people with hemorrhoids can diagnose and treat the problem themselves. Diagnosis begins with a visual examination of the anus, followed by an internal examination during which the doctor carefully inserts a gloved and lubricated finger into the anus. The doctor may also use an anoscope, a small tube that allows him or her to see into the anal canal. Under some circumstances the doctor may wish to check for other problems by using a sigmoidoscope or colonoscope, a flexible instrument that allows inspection of the lower colon (in the case of the sigmoidoscope) or the entire colon (in the case of the colonoscope). A thorough evaluation and proper diagnosis by the doctor is important any time bleeding from the rectum or blood in the stool occurs. Bleeding may also be a symptom of other digestive diseases, including colorectal cancer. The doctor will examine the anus and rectum to look for swollen blood vessels that indicate hemorrhoids and will also perform a digital rectal exam with a gloved, lubricated finger to feel for abnormalities. Closer evaluation of the rectum for hemorrhoids requires an exam with an anoscope, a hollow, lighted tube useful for viewing internal hemorrhoids, or a proctoscope, useful for more completely examining the entire rectum. To rule out other causes of gastrointestinal bleeding, the doctor may examine the rectum and lower colon (sigmoid) with sigmoidoscopy or the entire colon with colonoscopy. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are diagnostic procedures that also involve the use of lighted, flexible tubes inserted through the rectum.

Most individuals who have hemorrhoids discover them in one of several ways. They either feel the lump of an external hemorrhoid when they wipe themselves after a bowel movement, note drops of blood in the toilet bowl or on the toilet paper, or feel a prolapsing hemorrhoid (protruding from the anus) after bowel movements. Severe anal pain may occur when an external hemorrhoid thromboses, or a prolapsing internal hemorrhoid becomes gangrenous. Symptoms of anal discomfort and itching may occur, but anal conditions other than hemorrhoids are more likely to cause these symptoms than hemorrhoids. (Hemorrhoids often get a "bum rap" for such symptoms since both hemorrhoids and other anal conditions are common and may occur together. For example, up to 20% of individuals with hemorrhoids also have anal fissures)

A thorough evaluation and proper diagnosis by the doctor is important any time bleeding from the rectum or blood in the stool lasts more than a couple of days. Bleeding may also be a symptom of other digestive diseases, including colorectal cancer. The doctor examines the anus and rectum to look for swollen blood vessels that indicate hemorrhoids and will also perform a digital rectal exam with a gloved, lubricated finger to feel for abnormalities. Closer evaluation of the rectum for hemorrhoids requires an exam with an anoscope, a hollow, lighted tube useful for viewing internal hemorrhoids, or a proctoscope, useful for more completely examining the entire rectum. To rule out other causes of gastrointestinal bleeding, the doctor may examine the rectum and lower colon (sigmoid) with sigmoidoscopy or the entire colon with colonoscopy. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are diagnostic procedures that also involve the use of lighted, flexible tubes inserted through the rectum.

Rectal bleeding is the most common symptom of internal hemorrhoids. Since bleeding can also be a symptom of other more serious disorders (such as colon cancer), it's important to get an accurate diagnosis.
Learn more about pile, piles, hemorrhoids and hemroids.

Learn more about pile, piles, hemorrhoids and hemroids.

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